The Churches of Paris

Amazing Europe | | July 19, 2010 at 1:39 am




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I love Paris in the spring time
I love Paris in the fall
I love Paris in the winter when it drizzles
I love Paris in the summer when it sizzles

~Frank Sinatra’s lyrics to the song ‘I Love Paris’

There’s something about the air of Paris that sets it apart from other cities of the world. This capital city of France is famous for being an important centre of culture, education, fashion, media and science. There is, but, one more thing that Paris does beautifully – its churches and cathedrals.

They stand as witness to the years gone by. Their stained glass windows gently looking down upon you as you enter their gates. The walls whisper stories of miracles that these cathedrals and churches have witnessed over the years. Listen carefully and you’ll be surprised at what you hear. When in Paris, you must think of visiting these few churches.

NOTRE DAME CATHEDRAL –

This is perhaps one of the most famous churches of Paris; and even more so one of the world’s most famous cathedrals. Victor Hugo’s novel ‘The Hunchback of Notre Dame’ helped popularize this divine structure even more. Do not be surprised to see large crowds of people when you arrive here; it is crowded at almost any point of time in the year. You’ll have a long wait before you actually get a shot at climbing up the tower, but we suggest you keep your patience and wait; since the climb is totally worth the wait.

Notre Dame Cathedral

SACRE COEUR–

Located in the Montmarte area of Paris, the Sacre Coeur is almost equally famous as the Notre Dame Cathedral. The picturesque location atop the hill coupled with its dramatic white tones make for one superiorly photogenic structure. Get to the top of the hill and savor the views of Paris that this place has to offer.

Sacre coeur Paris

SAINT CHAPELLE –

This chapel may not be as famous as the predecessors on this list; but it does fall many a times on the must-see list of tourists. The stained windows make for a magnificent view; and if you’re lucky to get in on a day when it isn’t as crowded, you’ll see how peaceful this place can be.

Saint Chapelle Paris France

SAINT- SULPICE CHURCH–

The first thing to hit you when you near the Saint Sulpice is that it is a masterpiece of what is known as the French Classical Style of Architecture. The interiors of the church was completed in the 17th century and its external façade saw the light of day in the following century. The use of this structure in the Dan Brown book ‘The Da Vinci Code’ has made the place even more popular with tourists. The other specialties of this church would include the paintings that were done by Eugene Delacroix and the grand organ that was built by one of the greatest organ builders of the 19th century – Cavaille-Coll.

Saint Sulpice Church

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15 Comments

  1. abram says:

    here is, but, one more thing that Paris does beautifully – its churches and cathedrals.there is no surprise to see large crowds of people as it is crowded at almost any point of time in the year. but im sure it would be worth climbing the lovely NOTRE DAM CATHEDRAL,even if you have to wait.
    another famous like the same is the saint chapelle, which is a peaceful place to hav a beautiful start of the day.

    Saint Sulpice church shows you the awesome paintings that were done by Eugene Delacroix and the grand organ that was built by one of the greatest organ builders of the 19th century – Cavaille-Coll.

    this is rather a worth site seeing even if it takes immense time to get there.

  2. siril says:

    its awesome……!!!!!!!!!!

  3. Rocckstar says:

    Thank you so much!

    I’ve been trying to learn as much as I can about the Da Vinci i.e.Saint Sulpice Church

    This church my greatgrandfather’s family belonged to..He immigrated to Sweden in the late 1600′s.

    The photographs are so atmospheric and capture the essence of this amazing city. Thank you for sharing them.

  4. Starcy says:

    The Sainte Chapell is an absolute piece of Art of flamboyant Gothic architecture built by St. Louis in the Heart of the City Palace in Paris.

    Its unique stained glass windows render the air with colors of rainbow, which is a symbol of Jerusalem, the birthplace of Christ!

  5. Fredd says:

    A very large and fine pipe organ was built by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll for a private home in Biarritz, which is now kept in The Sacré-Cœur basilica.

    It is composed of 109 ranks and 78 speaking stops spread across four 61-note manuals and the 32-note pedalboard which is unusual before the turn of the century!

    The organ is ahead of its time, containing multiple expressive divisions and giving the performer considerable advantages over other even larger instruments of the day.

    It is almost identical (tonal characteristics, layout and casework) to the instrument in Sheffield’s Albert Hall, destroyed by fire in 1934.

    When it was installed in Paris by Charles Mutin, it lost its fine case for a much plainer one.

  6. Pete says:

    Wow Fred,

    That’s awesome information you’ve shared with us here…

    I was looking out for something unique and I ‘ve found it here in the discussions and the posts!

    Thanks all! :-)

  7. Pete says:

    Hey thanks!

    I went to Saint Sulfice after seeing the amazing pictures.My only regret it that I ‘m too old to do anything but climbing. But , yeah, it certainly did fire my imagination..!

    Can you tell me more about rose line and hidden underground vault..

    Some of these pictures give me vertigo and goosebumps!

    Thank you so much for posting the great pictures and information..!

    Cheers! :-)

  8. Sandra says:

    Hey thanks!

    I went to Saint Sulfice after seeing the amazing pictures.My only regret it that I ‘m too old to do anything but climbing. But , yeah, it certainly did fire my imagination..!

    Can you tell me more about rose line and hidden underground vault..

    Some of these pictures give me vertigo and goosebumps!

    Thank you so much for posting the great pictures and information..!

    Cheers! :-)

  9. Zeus says:

    The images are wonderful – there are so many intimate places in these huge buildings that no one ever gets to see – thank you for illuminating them for us.

    Thanks very much for these incredible images. I was drawn to Sulpice because of the famous organ and its list of world-famous organists.

    I must, however, take exception at your claim that this is the “Second largest Parisian church after Notre-Dame de Paris”.

    St. Eustache is much more larger than is Notre-Dame, and I believe that Sulpie is also larger than is Notre-Dame.

    I want to thank you for the images though :-)

  10. Zeus says:

    Notre-Dame viewed from it’s art perspective , takes your breath away more than its history, which is equally fascinating!

    There are 28 statues representing the monarchs of Judea and Israel on the west front contains

    The interior has columns which are designed to be very slender and graceful..!I’m completely in awe of these…

    Another thing which is really impressive is that there is room for as many as 6,000 worshipers!

    The three rose windows — to the west, north, and south — are masterful, their colors a glory to behold on a sunny day.

  11. Eddie Thomas says:

    I ‘ve been to Notre dame and they say that in 1768, some geographers decided that all distances in France would be measured from Notre-Dame.

    One hundred and seventy-six years later, when Paris was liberated during World War II, General de Gaulle rushed to the cathedral after his return, to pray in thanksgiving.

    In many ways, Notre-Dame was and still is the center of France.

    Thanks a lot for this post :-)

  12. Froster Gale says:

    Notre-Dame has had an eventful history over the centuries and some great architecture the world has ever seen..!

    It is said that before leaving on their holy wars ,crusaders prayed here Also,polyphonic music developed in the cathedral during this time.

    Notre-Dame was pillaged during the French revolution, as were a number of other cathedrals throughout France…

    Cool post :-)

  13. Daisy Grumpfield says:

    It seems that it was here in Notre Dame that Napoléon,crowned himself emperor!

    Also Joséphine, his Martinique-born wife, was crowned as his empress.

    He did this to establish the primacy of the state over the church.

    Pope Pius VII, there for the occasion, raised no objections, even though the crowning was supposed to be done by an archbishop.

  14. Daisy Grumpfield says:

    On has to make a climb of 387 steps to the top of one of the towers, for a look at the upper parts of the church, the river, and much of Paris.

    The south tower holds Notre-Dame’s 13-ton bell, which is rung on special occasions.

  15. Andrea says:

    One has to make a climb of 387 steps to the top of one of the towers, for a look at the upper parts of the church, the river, and much of Paris.

    Notre-Dame’s 13-ton bell, which is held by the south tower is rung on special occasions..!

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